The Linguistics of Empire: A Review of Babel, or The Necessity of Violence: An Arcane History of the Oxford Translators’ Revolution

            The thing about empire is that it is one of the easiest choices for a villain in fiction.  A large, oppressive, overwhelming force for the characters to fight against.  Authoritarian by design, ever expanding, singularly focused on consuming other cultures and nations to feed its own endless hunger.  Just look at Star Wars and its evil Galactic Empire.  Right away, in the opening crawl no less, we know who the villains of the story are.  The reasons for positioning an empire as a villainous force should be obvious when filtered through the lens of history.  Empire have left a long, bloody trail, expanding and collapsing throughout the millennia, from ancient Babylon to Portugal, the last “official” empire to dissolve with the transfer of Macau back to China in 1999.  However, one modern empire rises above them all in terms of lasing cultural influence; the British Empire.

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