Metamorphosis: A Review of Wrath Goddess Sing, by Maya Deane

            We all know the story of the Iliad, the ancient Greek poem detailing the story of Achilles during the time of the decade long Trojan War.  Helen, the queen of Sparta and the most beautify woman in the world, was taken to Troy by Paris, sparking a conflict between the Achaeans and the Trojans that would see many heroes dead by the finale.  Considered to have been written down for the first time in the 8th century BCE, commonly attributed to the legendary author known as Homer, whom the Odyssey is also attributed.  In truth, the story is likely much older than his written version, and would have had any different versions in accordance with the oral tradition of storytelling.  The Iliad has the remarkable distinction of being truly timeless, with it still being commonly read today and even taught in classes around the world.  This ever-lasting appeal has also led to constant re-imaginings and appropriations of the story, characters, and themes.  From feminist translations to complete overhauls, every storyteller has their own idea on what makes the story of Achilles great. 

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